Jean-Pierre Leburton

Jean-Pierre Leburton ((1949-03-04)March 4, 1949, Liège, Belgium-)[2][1] is the Gregory E. Stillman Professor of Electrical and Computer Engineering and professor of Physics at the University of Illinois at Urbana–Champaign.[3] He is also a full-time faculty member in the Nanoelectronics and Nanomaterials group of the Beckman Institute for Advanced Science and Technology.[4][5] He is known for his work on semiconductor theory and simulation, and on nanoscale quantum devices[1] including quantum wires, quantum dots, and quantum wells. He studies and develops nanoscale materials with potential electronic and biological applications.[6]

Jean-Pierre Leburton
Born (1949-03-04) March 4, 1949 (age 72)

Nationality American citizen[1]
Alma mater University of Liège
Scientific career
Fields Physics, Semiconductors, Nanoelectronics and Nanomaterials
Institutions University of Illinois at Urbana–Champaign
External video
Genomics with Semiconductor Nanotechnology, Jean Pierre Leburton

. . . Jean-Pierre Leburton . . .

Jean-Pierre Leburton was born on (1949-03-04)March 4, 1949 to Edmond Jules Leburton and Charlotte (Joniaux) Leburton in Liège, Belgium.[2] His father, at one time Prime Minister of Belgium, sparked Jean-Pierre Leburton’s interest in physics.[6]

Jean-Pierre Leburton received his Licence (B.Sc.) in Physics in 1971 and his Doctorat (Ph.D.) in 1978 from the University of Liège, Belgium.[7][1]

Leburton worked as a research scientist at the Siemens AG research laboratory in Munich, Germany from 1979 to 1981.[8][1][9]

From 1981-1983, Leburton worked at the University of Illinois at Urbana–Champaign (UIUC) as a visiting assistant professor. In 1983 he joined the faculty as an assistant professor. He became an associate Professor in 1987 and a full professor in 1991. He worked with Karl Hess, co-director of the Beckman Institute for Advanced Science and Technology, and became one of the original faculty members at the Beckman Institute in 1989.[6]

He held the Hitachi LTD Chair on Quantum Materials as a visiting professor at the University of Tokyo, Japan in 1992. He was also a visiting professor at the Swiss Federal Institute of Technology in Lausanne, Switzerland in 2000.[10]

In 2003, he was named the Gregory E. Stillman Professor of Electrical and Computer Engineering at the University of Illinois.[3] He has been the head of the Computational Electronics group at the Beckman Institute,[11] and is currently a full-time faculty member in the Nanoelectronics and Nanomaterials group at the Beckman Institute.[12] In 2008 he also became a professor of physics at UIUC.[3]

He has published more than 300 papers in technical journals and books.[10] He is first editor of Phonons in semiconductor nanostructures (1993)[13] and co-editor of Contemporary Topics in Semiconductor Spintronics (2017),[14] among others.

. . . Jean-Pierre Leburton . . .

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. . . Jean-Pierre Leburton . . .