Angkor I

Angkor I is an outdoor stainless steel sculpture by Lee Kelly, located at Millennium Plaza Park in Lake Oswego, Oregon, in the United States. The 1994 sculpture stands 14 feet (4.3 m) tall and weighs 1,000 pounds (450 kg), and was influenced by his visit to Southeast Asia one year prior. In 2010, Angkor I appeared in an exhibition of Kelly’s work at the Portland Art Museum. In 2011, it was installed at Millennium Plaza Park on loan from the Portland-based Elizabeth Leach Gallery. The Arts Council of Lake Oswego began soliciting donations in 2013 in an attempt to keep the sculpture as part of the city’s permanent public art collection, Gallery Without Walls. The fundraising campaign was successful; donations from more than 40 patrons, including major contributions from the Ford Family Foundation and the Oregon Arts Commission, made purchase of the sculpture possible. Angkor I has been called a “recognizable icon” and a “gateway” to the park’s lake.

Sculpture by Lee Kelly in Lake Oswego, Oregon, U.S.

Angkor I

The sculpture in April 2014
Artist Lee Kelly
Year 1994 (1994)
Type Sculpture
Medium Stainless steel
Dimensions 4.3 m (14 ft)
Weight 1,000 lb (450 kg)
Location Lake Oswego, Oregon, United States
Coordinates

45°25′04″N122°39′53″W

. . . Angkor I . . .

Angkor I was designed by Lee Kelly, an Idaho-born Oregon sculptor whose works are influenced by modernism and abstract impressionism.[1] Created in 1994, Angkor I is a large-scale stainless steel sculpture with a surface that is “gesturally and roughly finished”.[2][3] It stands 14 feet (4.3 m) tall and weighs 1,000 pounds (450 kg).[4] In Living in Sculpture: The Studio Work of Lee Kelly, Paul Sutinen writes that Angkor I, along with Angkor II and Phi Mai, were influenced by Kelly’s 1993 visit to Cambodia, Indonesia and Thailand.[5] His visit to the temple complex Angkor Wat inspired the sculpture,[6] as evidenced by its plaque.

In October 2010, Kelly moved the sculpture to the Portland Art Museum for his summation exhibit, which was open through January 2011.[7] Later that year,[8] the sculpture was installed at Millennium Plaza Park in Lake Oswego, on loan from Elizabeth Leach Gallery, the Portland-based company which represents Kelly.[3][9] A board member for the Arts Council of Lake Oswego had initiated the loan proposal to Kelly and the gallery for this public display. According to Nancy Nye, executive director of the council, the sculpture is prominent in the park and “provides a gateway to the lake”.[4]

. . . Angkor I . . .

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. . . Angkor I . . .