Raphael Cilento

Sir Raphael West Cilento (2 December 1893  15 April 1985), often known as “Ray”,[1] was a notable Australian medical practitioner and public healthadministrator.

Raphael Cilento

Cilento wearing legal robes in 1941
Born
Raphael West Cilento

(1893-12-02)2 December 1893

Died 15 April 1985(1985-04-15) (aged 91)

Education Teacher, medical practitioner
Known for Aiding Refugees Post World War II
Relatives Phyllis Cilento (wife)
Diane Cilento (daughter)
Jason Connery (grandson)
Medical career
Profession Medical practitioner
Institutions Australian Army’s Tropical Force
Australian Institute of Tropical Medicine (1922-24)
Commonwealth Government’s Division of Tropical Hygiene (1928-34)
Queensland Health Department
United Nations refugees and displaced Persons (1946-47)
Australian League of Rights
Sub-specialties Administering Tropical Medicine
Research Public health – tropical medicine
Awards Knighted, 1935

. . . Raphael Cilento . . .

Cilento was born in Jamestown, South Australia, in 1893, son of Raphael Ambrose Cilento, a stationmaster (whose father Salvatore had emigrated from Naples, Italy in 1855),[2] and Frances Ellen Elizabeth (née West).[1] His younger brother Alan Watson West Cilento (born 1908) became General Manager of the Savings Bank of South Australia from 1961 to 1968.[3] He was educated at Prince Alfred College,[3] but although he was determined from an early age to study medicine, he was initially thwarted in doing so due to lack of money. Therefore, he trained first as a school teacher, sponsored by the Education Department, from 1908 and taught at Port Pirie in 1910 and 1911.[1] He eventually entered the University of Adelaide Medical School on borrowed funds, but while there he won so many scholarships and other prizes that he ended his course with a respectable bank balance.

For the earlier part of his working life, Cilento’s interests were mainly in public health and, specifically, tropical medicine. He served with the Australian Army’s Tropical Force in New Guinea which superseded the German administration after the First World War. Later he joined the British colonial service in Malaya.

On his return to Australia he was Director of the Australian Institute of Tropical Medicine in Townsville, Queensland, from 1922 to 1924.[1]

. . . Raphael Cilento . . .

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. . . Raphael Cilento . . .