Places with unusual names

Whether they’re unusually short, unusually long, sound like a surprising or naughty English word, or are just plain silly, places with unusual names can be fun destinations.

. . . Places with unusual names . . .

Both in English-speaking countries and elsewhere you can find places that have names that sound weird to English speakers. Many of these places are small towns without much to do, but some offer T-shirts or other souvenirs with the place’s name. If nothing else, you can always take a picture with a highway sign or “Welcome to X” sign to show your friends later. In non-English speaking countries, however, you may encounter even large cities and major travel destinations with unusual names.

For English-speaking countries, it’s common that a funny name derives from a completely normal name in an older form of English or a native name for the place. In a few cases the name has been intentionally changed from a normal name to a more unusual one. In non-English speaking countries the unusual name of the place is of course just a normal name to the locals. This works the other way around too, normal names in English-speaking countries might sound funny to a foreigner. For instance, the small town of Roto, Australia has found its way onto lists of funny place names in Spanish, in which it means “broken”. Finnish-speaking visitors may find Herne (“pea”) Bay in Kent funny, as well as Piha (“yard”) in New Zealand and the country of Nauru (“laughter”).

All but the smallest destinations on the list usually have other attractions, but given that you are in a place with a funny or unusual name, why not take a photo of road, street and perhaps even business signs with the name?

In some cases the place has indeed turned the name into a tourist attraction and therefore there are funny souvenirs you can buy, like the “Hell frozen over” postcards. Look out for bumper stickers, hats, T-shirts, postcards, or similar items at general stores, gas stations and souvenir shops.

. . . Places with unusual names . . .

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. . . Places with unusual names . . .