Khasab

Khasab (Arabic: خصب‎) is a city in the northwest Omani exclave of Musandam and home to about 18,000 inhabitants. It is the state capital of the Musandam peninsula on the coast of the Hormuz Strait between Iran, the United Arab Emirates and Oman.

Harbour front mosque

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Khasab was isolated from the rest of the region for a long time. In the 16th century Portuguese troops conquered the peninsula and established colonial structures. After Oman regained control, Khasab was controlled tightly due to its strategic position. The construction of the new road from the United Arab Emirates was itself started by the city to develop its infrastructure and encourage more tourism and investment. It is most popular to spend a weekend off from Dubai or to visit on your way to Muscat, taking the twice a day ferry-boat along the deserted and arid rocky coast of Musandam.

The city is the starting point to explore the little-known Musandam Peninsula and its special and unique traditions and culture. Travellers can enjoy great sights in and around the city that can be seen in two or three days cruising the region.

Khasab is best visited in the winter, as it is one of the hottest places in Oman, with summer temperatures regularly climbing over 45°C. The world’s highest minimum temperature (41.2°C, since broken) was recorded on the airport in 2011, and in 2017 the highest nighttime low temperature recorded (44.2 °C) was recorded.

Map of Khasab

Khasab is not easy to access, although you have a few transportation options, including daily morning flights from Muscat, a weekly ferry from Muscat or semi-weekly ferry from Dibba, or driving from the UAE through the Al Darah border post.

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