Munich

Munich (German: München, Bavarian: Minga) is the capital city of the German federal state of Bavaria. Within the city limits, Munich has a population of more than 1.5 million, making it the third most populous city in Germany. Greater Munich including its suburbs has a population of 2.7 million. The Munich metropolitan region which extends to cities like Augsburg or Ingolstadt has a population of more than 5.6 million.

Munich is a huge city with several district articles that contain information about specific sights, restaurants, and accommodation.

Located at the river Isar in Southern Bavaria, it is famous for its beautiful architecture, fine culture, history and the annual Oktoberfest beer festival. Munich has a thriving cultural scene and many travellers are absolutely stunned by its architecture. Although it was heavily damaged by Allied bombing during World War II, many of its historic buildings have been rebuilt, including its largest church, the Frauenkirche cathedral, and the famous City Hall. Its numerous architectural attractions, sports events, zoo, exhibitions and the Oktoberfest attract considerable tourism.

Munich is a major global center of engineering, science, innovation, and research, exemplified by the presence of two research universities, a multitude of scientific institutions in the city and its surroundings, and world class technology and science museums like the Deutsches Museum and BMW Museum. Munich is a major center of art, finance, publishing, culture and media, education, and business internationally, housing several multinational companies. Its economy is also based on high-tech, automobiles, the service sector and creative industries, as well as IT and biotech. It enjoys a very high standard and quality of life. Munich is one of the most prosperous and fastest growing cities in Germany.

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Munich is divided into 25 administrative districts. However, those districts don’t necessarily reflect historical relationships and connections of neighbourhoods, or make much sense to travellers. Therefore, the districts provided below describe entities in a travel rather than administrative sense. Most of Munich’s main attractions are in the Altstadt and Maxvorstadt; the districts of Ludwigsvorstadt-Isarvorstadt and Haidhausen are major night-life spots. The other areas, while mostly residential, feature some hidden gems, which are definitely worth a visit.

Map of Munich

  Altstadt (Old City)
The city centre with a pedestrian zone that is one big shopping street, and the majority of Munich’s most famous travel sights around Marienplatz.
  Maxvorstadt
The Brain of Munich with a relaxed and studenty atmosphere, which is home to most attractions that aren’t in the city centre, including the world famous galleries Pinakotheken, along with cozy cafés and bars and several universities.
  Ludwigsvorstadt-Isarvorstadt
Night-life area immediately south of the centre, home to many cafés, restaurants, bars, clubs and theatres, hotels and hostels, and the focal point of Munich’s gay scene. Here find Munich Central Station, the Oktoberfest grounds and, last but not least, the Deutsches Museum, the world’s biggest museum of science and engineering
  Haidhausen
Around the station Munich East, to which Europe’s largest contiguous party area Kultfabrik & Optimolwerke draws tens of thousands of people every weekend.
  Northern Munich
The Northern part of Munich is full of parks, gardens and relaxation areas. It includes the district of Schwabing, dominated by 19th-century architecture and the famously expansive English Garden, the park and palace of Nymphenburg, the Olympiagelände (site of the 1972 Olympic Games) with the BMW Welt and the Allianz Arena in the far north end.
  East Munich
A mostly residential area with an upmarket neighbourhood to the north, a working-class neighbourhood and the Bavaria Film Studios to the south, the Munich trade fair grounds in the east, and the Flaucher beaches along the east side of the river Isar in the west.
  South-West Munich
Scarcely populated in the west and mainly residential area in the south, with the main attractions Munich Zoo and the Flaucher river islands lying in the east of the area along the river Isar.

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