Grammy Award for Best Engineered Album, Non-Classical

The Grammy Award for Best Engineered Album, Non-Classical has been awarded since 1959. The award had several minor name changes:

  • In 1959, the award was known as Best Engineered Record – Non-Classical
  • In 1960, it was awarded as Best Engineering Contribution – Other Than Classical or Novelty
  • From 1961 to 1962, it was awarded as Best Engineering Contribution – Popular Recording
  • In 1963, it was awarded as Best Engineering Contribution – Other Than Novelty and Other Than Classical
  • In 1964, it was awarded as Best Engineered Recording – Other Than Classical
  • From 1965 to 1991, it returned to the title Best Engineered Recording – Non-Classical
  • Since 1992, it has been awarded as Best Engineered Album, Non-Classical
This article does not cite any sources. (December 2020)
Grammy Award for Best Engineered Album, Non-Classical
Awarded for Quality engineering for a non-classical album
Country United States
Presented by National Academy of Recording Arts and Sciences
First awarded 1959
Currently held by Hyperspace (2021)
Website grammy.com

This award is presented alongside the Grammy Award for Best Engineered Album, Classical. From 1960 to 1965 a further award was presented for Best Engineered Recording – Special or Novel Effects.

Years reflect the year in which the Grammy Awards were presented, for works released in the previous year. The award is presented to the audio engineer(s) on the winning work, not to the artist or performer, except if the artist is also a credited engineer.

. . . Grammy Award for Best Engineered Album, Non-Classical . . .

Year Winner(s) Album Artist Nominees (Artist in parentheses)
2022 Winner TBA on 31 January 2022
2021 Drew Brown, Julian Burg, Andrew Coleman, Paul Epworth, Shawn Everett, Serban Ghenea, David Greenbaum, John Hanes, Beck Hansen, Jaycen Joshua, Greg Kurstin, Mike Larson, Cole M.G.N., Alex Pasco & Matt Wiggins (engineers); Randy Merrill (mastering engineer) Hyperspace Beck
2020 Rob Kinelski & Finneas O’Connell (engineers); John Greenham (mastering engineer) When We All Fall Asleep, Where Do We Go? Billie Eilish

. . . Grammy Award for Best Engineered Album, Non-Classical . . .

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