AVN Awards

The AVN Awards are film awards sponsored and presented by the American adult video industry trade magazineAVN (Adult Video News) to recognize achievement in various aspects of the creation and marketing of American pornographic films. They are often called the “Oscars of porn”.[1][4][5]

Adult entertainment industry award

AVN Awards
Current: 38th AVN Awards

The 2015 AVN Award statuette for the category “Best Director  Feature”, won by Brad Armstrong
Sponsored by Adult Video News
Location Las Vegas, Nevada
Country United States
Presented by Adult Video News
Reward(s) Trophy
First awarded 1984; 37 years ago (1984)[1]
Last awarded Present
Website avn.com/awards
Television/radio coverage
Network
Most recent AVN Award winners


 2020 2021[2] 2022 
 
Award Best Actor Best Actress Best Supporting Actor
Winner Seth Gamble Maitland Ward Xander Corvus
Film A Killer on the Loose Muse The Summoning
 
Award Best Supporting Actress Male Performer of the Year Female Performer of the Year
Winner Kira Noir Small Hands Emily Willis
Film Primary
 
Award Transgender Performer of the Year Male Foreign Performer of the Year Female Foreign Performer of the Year
Winner Aubrey Kate Rocco Siffredi Clea Gaultier

Previous Best Picture

Teenage Lesbian[3]

Best Picture

TBD

Graphic artwork representing a “AVN Awards” trophy
AVN Awards show, Hard Rock Hotel

The awards are divided into over 100 categories, some of which are analogous to industry awards offered in other film and video genres and others that are specific to pornographic/erotic film and video.[6]

AVN sponsored the first AVN Awards ceremony in February 1984. The award ceremony occurs in early January during the AVN Adult Entertainment Expo in Las Vegas, Nevada. Since 2008, the ceremony has aired in a form edited for time on Showtime, which is usually broadcast in a 90-minute time slot.[7]

Awards for gay adult video were a part of the AVN Awards from the 1987 ceremony through the 1998 ceremony. The increasing number of categories made the show unwieldy. For the 1999 ceremony AVN Magazine began hosting the GayVN Awards, an annual adult movie award event for gay adult video.[8]

. . . AVN Awards . . .

  • Best Actor
  • Best Actress
  • Best Supporting Actor
  • Best Supporting Actress
  • Male Performer of the Year
  • Female Performer of the Year
  • Male Foreign Performer of the Year
  • Female Foreign Performer of the Year
  • Transgender Performer of the Year
  • Director of the Year
  • Best New Starlet
  • Best Director
  • Best Non-Sex Performance
  • Best Cinematography
  • Best All-Sex Video
  • Best Renting Title of the Year
  • Best Selling Title of the Year
  • Best Film
  • Best Video Feature
  • Best Foreign Feature
  • Best Tease Performance
  • Best All-Girl Sex Scene
  • Best All-Girl Feature
  • Best Newcomer – Gay Video
  • Best Bi-Sexual Video
  • Best Gay Video
  • Best Actor – Gay Video
  • Best Supporting Actor – Gay Video
  • Best Director – Bi-Sexual Video
  • Best Director – Gay Video
  • Best Screenplay – Gay Video
  • Best Sex Scene – Gay Video
  • Best Non-Sexual Performance – Bi, Gay, or Trans Video
  • Best Gay Alternative Video
  • Best Gay Solo Video
  • Best Gay Specialty Release
  • Best Videography – Gay Video
  • Best Alternative Adult Feature Film
  • Most Outrageous Sex Scene
  • Best Sex Comedy
  • Breakthrough Award
  • Best Performer of the Year – Gay Video
  • Best Male Newcomer
  • Best Director – Foreign Release
  • Best Classic Release
  • Best DVD
  • Best High Definition Production
  • Unsung Starlet of the Year
  • Best High-End All-Sex Release
  • Best All-Sex Release
  • Best MILF Release
  • Director of the Year
  • Best Director – Feature
  • Best Director – Foreign Feature
  • Best Boy/Girl Scene
  • Best All-Girl Couples Sex Scene
  • MILF Performer of the Year

Originally, the awards show was part of the Consumer Electronics Show (CES) in Las Vegas, but it grew and garnered more attention over time, allowing it to be established as a separate event in the 1990s.[9] The event started out as the “Adult Software exhibition” of the show, which attracted as many as 100,000 visitors in addition to those attending CES. When the show became a separate event, it initially moved to Caesar’s Palace, but it has since moved to other Las Vegas venues.[10]

A writer from Los Angeles magazine made the claim in 2006 that awards often go to consistent advertisers in AVN magazine.[11] In his article, the writer stated: “Imagine the editors of Variety choosing the Academy Award nominations—then handing out Oscars to the winners—and you have a pretty good idea of how much manipulation can go on behind the scenes during the run-up to the AVNs. […] Actresses trying to secure a nomination stop in to schmooze at the magazine’s Chatsworth offices. [An agency] client once presented dolls of herself to editors and writers. Another baked cookies”. Similar allegations have been made regarding the Academy Award nominations and influencing Academy member voting that date back to at least 1988 with regard to movies such as Rain Man.[10][12]

In 2013, actress Tanya Tate offered some insights into the industry in an interview with the Huffington Post about the 30th AVN Awards at which she was nominated for an award. She stated: “If you are more popular with the fans, companies are more likely to book you for their production”, “Being nominated for awards help build your recognition with your fan base. People that win male and female performer of the year are generally solid consistent talent that are open to many ‘levels’, and some of these performers already have higher basic rates than others”.[13]

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