(6382) 1988 EL

(6382) 1988 EL, is a stony Hungaria asteroid from the inner regions of the asteroid belt, approximately 5 kilometers in diameter. It was discovered on 14 March 1988, by American astronomer Jeffrey Alu at the U.S. Palomar Observatory, California.[2]

(6382) 1988 EL
Discovery[1]
Discovered by J. Alu
Discovery site Palomar Obs.
Discovery date 14 March 1988
Designations
(6382) 1988 EL
1988 EL · 1983 EC1
main-belt · (inner)[1]
Hungaria[2][3]
Orbital characteristics[1]
Epoch 4 September 2017 (JD 2458000.5)
Uncertainty parameter 0
Observation arc 29.01 yr (10,596 days)
Aphelion 1.9102 AU
Perihelion 1.7388 AU
1.8245 AU
Eccentricity 0.0470
2.46 yr (900 days)
349.44°
0° 23m 59.64s / day
Inclination 18.556°
350.60°
191.91°
Physical characteristics
Dimensions 4.22 km (calculated)[3]
4.931±0.042 km[1][4]
5.311±0.013 km[5]
2.892±0.005 h[6]
2.8932±0.0005 h[7]
2.894±0.001 h[8]
2.895±0.002h[9]
2.898±0.001 h[10]
0.1896±0.0604[5]
0.254±0.035[1][4]
0.3 (assumed)[3]
E[3] · S[8]
13.8[1][3][5] · 14.08±0.49[11]

    . . . (6382) 1988 EL . . .

    The presumed E-type asteroid may not be a member of the Hungaria family, which form the innermost dense concentration of asteroids in the Solar System, but an unrelated interloper, which intruded into the Hungaria orbital space, as indicated by a lower albedos from observations by the NEOWISE mission.[7]:169 It orbits the Sun at a distance of 1.7–1.9 AU once every 2 years and 6 months (900 days). Its orbit has an eccentricity of 0.05 and an inclination of 19° with respect to the ecliptic.[1] The body’s first yet unused observation was made at the Chinese Purple Mountain Observatory in 1983.[2] On 13 April 2042 and on 3 October 2113, the asteroid will pass 0.086 AU (12,900,000 km) and 0.092 AU (13,800,000 km) from Mars, respectively.[1]

    Between February 2005 and January 2015, American astronomer Brian D. Warner obtained 5 rotational lightcurves for this asteroid from photometric observations at the CS3–Palmer Divide Station in Colorado. The lightcurves gave a well-defined rotation period of 2.892–2.898 hours with a low brightness variation between 0.06 and 0.15 magnitude (U=2/3-/3/2+/3).[6][7][8][9][10]

    . . . (6382) 1988 EL . . .

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    . . . (6382) 1988 EL . . .