Chad Harris-Crane

Chad Harris-Crane is a fictional character on the American soap opera Passions, which aired on NBC from 1999 to 2007 and on DirecTV in 2007–08. Developed by the soap’s creator and head writerJames E. Reilly, Chad was portrayed by two actors over the course of the show: Donn Swaby (1999 to 2002) and Charles Divins (2002 to 2007). Swaby left the show to pursue roles outside daytime television and was replaced by Divins. The role was the first time that either actor had worked on a television series.

Soap opera character

Chad Harris-Crane

Charles Divins as Chad Harris-Crane
Passions character
Portrayed by Donn Swaby (1999–2002)
Charles Divins
(2002–07)
Duration 1999–2007
First appearance September 23, 1999
Last appearance August 28, 2007
Created by James E. Reilly
Classification Former, regular
Profile
Other names Chad Harris
Occupation
Family
Family Crane
Father Alistair Crane
Mother Liz Sanbourne
Half-brothers Julian Crane
Half-sisters
Spouse LaToya Harris (until 2003)
Whitney Russell (2006–07)
Children Miles Harris-Crane
Unnamed child
Grandmothers Ruby Lincoln (adoptive)
Aunts Eve Russell (adoptive)
Nieces and nephews Vincent Clarkson
Fancy Crane
Fox Crane (deceased)
Pretty Crane
James Boothe (adoptive)
Endora Lenox
Marty Lopez-Fitzgerald
Unnamed nephew
First cousins Vincent Clarkson (adoptive)
Whitney Russell (adoptive)
Simone Russell (adoptive)

Chad is a member of the Crane family. The illegitimate son of the evil patriarch Alistair Crane, Chad is introduced as a music producer from Los Angeles who is searching for his biological family. Chad becomes involved in a love triangle with sisters Whitney and Simone Russell. His romance with Whitney is complicated by the possibility they may be engaging in an incestuous relationship as Chad is initially believed to be her half-brother, and later revealed to be her adoptive cousin. Chad’s later storylines focus on his confusion over his sexual identity, and his sexual relationship with tabloid reporter Vincent Clarkson. Chad attempts to reconcile with Whitney, after his affair with Vincent is revealed, before being killed by his father Alistair while trying to protect his best friend, Ethan Winthrop.

Critical response to Chad was mixed; some reviewers praised the sensationalism of the incest storyline with Whitney, while others criticized his relationship with Vincent as an irresponsible and problematic representation of racial and sexual identity. The character marks a notable step in daytime television and soap opera history; it was the first depiction in a soap opera of two men having sex. Chad has also been cited as expanding the representation of LGBT characters of color on daytime television. Divins discussed the storyline with his gay friends and researched LGBT culture to better shape his performance. Media outlets expressed varying opinions of the exact nature of Chad’s sexual orientation.

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Sheraton Kalouria, senior vice president of NBC’s daytime programming,[1] described the show’s use of color-blind casting as part of an effort to build a diverse pool of characters that best reflected the various ethnic and racial groups living in the United States. Kalouria believed the show was set apart from other soap operas by the inclusion of “the African American Russells and the Hispanic Lopez-Fitzgeralds“.[2]

The role was played by two actors over the course of the show: Donn Swaby (1999 to 2002) and Charles Divins (2002 to 2007).[3]Passions was Swaby’s first role in a television series.[4] On May 27, 2002, Swaby announced on his official website that he had decided to leave the show to pursue other opportunities outside of daytime television.[5] Divins assumed the role on September 12, 2002.[6] It was his first audition and acting experience; he had previously worked full-time as a fashion model and had decided to pursue an acting career after appearing in commercials.[7] Divins initially auditioned for another soap opera, but its producers suggested that he instead take a role on Passions.[8] He described his time working on the show as a “scholarship to acting”.[9]

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